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Etravirine Dosage - Infections During Pregnancy

This page contains links to eMedTV STD Articles containing information on subjects from Etravirine Dosage to Infections During Pregnancy. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Etravirine Dosage
    There is only one standard etravirine dosage -- 200 mg twice daily after meals. This section of the eMedTV library provides more dosing information, including dosing tips and precautions to be aware of before starting treatment.
  • Etravirine Drug Information
    This eMedTV Web page takes a quick look at etravirine, a medication used to treat HIV and AIDS. This article provides information on how to use etravirine and lists some safety warnings for this prescription drug.
  • Falmina
    As a prescription birth control pill, Falmina works to prevent pregnancy primarily by stopping ovulation. This eMedTV segment contains a complete overview of how this prescription contraceptive works, possible side effects, dosing instructions, and more.
  • Falmina Birth Control Information
    This eMedTV article presents a brief overview of Falmina, including information on how this birth control pill works, possible side effects, and instructions on how to take it effectively. A link to more details on this contraceptive is also included.
  • Falmina Dosage
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the Falmina dosing guidelines for birth control are the same for all women. This page also contains instructions on what to do if you forget to take the pills and lists some helpful tips on how to use Falmina effectively.
  • Falmina Side Effects
    Common side effects of Falmina may include nausea, headaches, and breast tenderness. This eMedTV Web page focuses on other possible problems that may occur in some women who take this birth control pill, including serious reactions that require treatment.
  • Fosamprenavir
    Fosamprenavir is a prescription medicine licensed to treat HIV and AIDS. This article from the eMedTV Web site explains how it works and offers a more in-depth look at the drug's effects, possible side effects, and dosing information.
  • Fosamprenavir Calcium Information
    Are you looking for information about fosamprenavir calcium? This eMedTV selection takes a quick look at this HIV/AIDS medication, with details on how often it is taken, what to discuss with your healthcare provider, and more.
  • Fosamprenavir Dosing
    Adults who have never taken protease inhibitors before may take 1400 mg of fosamprenavir twice daily. This eMedTV segment offers other fosamprenavir dosing options for adults and also includes dosing guidelines for children.
  • Generess Fe
    As a prescription birth control pill, Generess Fe works to prevent pregnancy mainly by stopping ovulation. This eMedTV article offers a detailed description on how Generess Fe works and also discusses its possible side effects and dosing guidelines.
  • Generess Fe and Breastfeeding
    Women are usually advised to avoid using combined contraceptives (such as Generess Fe) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV resource further explores this topic, explaining how this birth control pill can affect the quality and production of breast milk.
  • Generess Fe and Pregnancy
    Do not intentionally take Generess Fe when pregnant. This selection from the eMedTV Web site provides more information on taking this contraceptive during pregnancy, explaining whether it would cause problems in a developing baby.
  • Generess Fe and Weight Gain
    This eMedTV page explains that although some women may gain weight while taking Generess Fe, it is unlikely that the weight gain is due to the birth control pill. This article explores this topic, including helpful tips on how to control your weight.
  • Generess Fe Birth Control Information
    This eMedTV Web selection provides important information on Generess Fe, a birth control pill that can be chewed. This article offers a brief overview of the oral contraceptive, including how it works, possible side effects, and general dosing guidelines.
  • Generess Fe Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that the dosing guidelines for Generess Fe are the same for all women. This article also offers detailed information on what to do if you forget to take a dose and outlines some important tips on taking the pill.
  • Generess Fe Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV page explains that taking Generess Fe with certain medications can make the birth control pill less effective. This article lists the drugs that can cause negative interactions with Generess Fe and describes other problems that can occur.
  • Generess Fe Overdose
    If you have taken too much Generess Fe, it may cause nausea and vomiting. This eMedTV page covers other overdose effects and treatment options, and explains the potential dangers of iron toxicity if children accidentally overdose on these pills.
  • Generess Fe Side Effects
    A few of the common side effects of Generess Fe include headaches, nausea, and breast pain. This eMedTV Web selection describes other common reactions to Generess Fe, as well as potentially serious problems that may require prompt medical care.
  • Generess Fe Uses
    Generess Fe is prescribed to prevent pregnancy in adult and adolescent females who are of reproductive age. This eMedTV resource explains how this contraceptive works and explores other possible Generess Fe uses, such as its off-label use for acne.
  • Generess Fe Warnings and Precautions
    Generess Fe can make depression worse or increase your blood pressure. This eMedTV Web page lists other warnings and precautions to be aware of before starting Generess Fe, including information on who should not use the contraceptive.
  • Generic Depo-Provera
    This page of the eMedTV Web site explains that there are two available forms of generic Depo-Provera (medroxyprogesterone intramuscular injection). This page also discusses whether these generics are as good as the brand-name medication.
  • Generic Estrostep Fe
    This eMedTV segment explains that generic Estrostep Fe is sold under two different names. This page describes generic Estrostep Fe in more detail and explains how the FDA has determined that this generic product is as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Generess Fe
    There are no generic Generess Fe products available at this time. This eMedTV page discusses when a generic version of this contraceptive might be available and explains why this birth control pill should not cost more than $25 a package.
  • Generic Levlite
    Levlite is available in two different generic forms. This segment from the eMedTV site explains that generic Levlite (which is sold under the names Lessina and Sronyx) is equivalent to Levlite, but it may contain different inactive ingredients.
  • Generic Lo Minastrin Fe
    There are no generic Lo Minastrin Fe products available at this time. This eMedTV segment discusses when a generic version of this contraceptive might become available. It also explains whether insurance will cover this type of birth control pill.
  • Generic Loestrin
    Junel and Microgestin are among the generic versions of Loestrin. This selection from the eMedTV Web site takes an in-depth look at generic Loestrin, including an explanation of how the FDA determines if a generic drug is equivalent to a brand-name drug.
  • Generic MetroGel-Vaginal
    As explained in this eMedTV Web selection, generic MetroGel-Vaginal (metronidazole vaginal gel) is currently available and made by various companies. This page also discusses how these generic products compare to the brand-name medicine.
  • Generic Mifeprex
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, there are no generic versions of Mifeprex (mifepristone) available at this time. This page discusses some of the possible reasons why a generic Mifeprex product is not available and when a generic might be made.
  • Generic Minastrin 24 Fe
    There are no generic Minastrin 24 Fe products available at this time. This eMedTV Web page discusses when a generic version of this contraceptive might become available. It also explains whether insurance will cover this type of birth control pill.
  • Generic Modicon
    Generic versions of Modicon are currently available. This eMedTV article explains how these generic Modicon products are as good as the brand-name medication and also discusses how Brevicon is equivalent to Modicon.
  • Generic Natazia
    There are no generic Natazia products available on the market today. This eMedTV page explains that the earliest possible date that a generic version could become available is 2016. This page also discusses whether insurance covers this contraceptive.
  • Generic Nor-QD
    As this eMedTV article explains, several generic Nor-QD products are currently available on the market, sold under various names. This page describes them in more detail, explaining how they compare to the brand-name version.
  • Generic Nordette
    There are currently generic Nordette products available on the market. This eMedTV article lists the names under which these products are sold and explains if they are equivalent to the brand-name birth control pill.
  • Generic Ogestrel
    There are currently no generic Ogestrel products available. However, as this eMedTV page explains, Ogestrel is a generic version of Ovral, which is no longer available. This page also discusses how no other products are equivalent to Ogestrel.
  • Generic Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo
    At this time, Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo is not available in generic form. This article from the eMedTV site discusses when generic Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo may become available and explains whether insurances companies are likely to cover this contraceptive.
  • Generic Ortho-Cyclen
    There are five generic Ortho-Cyclen products available. This eMedTV resource describes generic Ortho-Cyclen in more detail and explains whether these products are equivalent to the brand-name version.
  • Generic Ortho-Novum
    There are many generic Ortho-Novum products available. This eMedTV page further briefly describes these generic forms of Ortho-Novum and also explains that Norinyl is another equivalent birth control pill.
  • Generic Quartette
    No generic versions of Quartette (levonorgestrel/ethinyl estradiol) are available at this time, as this eMedTV page explains. This resource looks at why such a product is not currently available and when this situation might change.
  • Generic Safyral
    At this time, generic Safyral is not available. This selection from the eMedTV library talks about why you cannot buy a generic form of this birth control pill and lists the earliest date that a generic version could be expected.
  • Generic Skyla
    No generic Skyla is available at this time, as it is protected by certain patents. This eMedTV Web selection offers a discussion on when these patents are expected to expire and when a generic version of the drug might become available.
  • Generic Tri-Norinyl
    Aranelle and Leena are the generic versions of Tri-Norinyl. This portion of the eMedTV Web site explains that the FDA has assigned these generic Tri-Norinyl products an "AB" rating, meaning they are as good as the brand-name contraceptive.
  • Generic Veregen
    You cannot buy a generic Veregen (sinecatechins) product at this time. The reasons for this are covered in this eMedTV Web selection, with details on why a generic version has not yet been made and whether one will become available at a later date.
  • Generic Zovia
    This eMedTV page explains that although there is no generic Zovia, there is another birth control pill that is equivalent to Zovia, called Kelnor. This page explains that Zovia and Kelnor are generic versions of Demulen, which is no longer available.
  • Gianvi
    Gianvi is a birth control pill that is available by prescription. This selection from the eMedTV Web library offers an overview of this contraceptive, including details on how Gianvi works, potential side effects, and tips on when and how to take it.
  • Gianvi Birth Control Information
    Gianvi is a combined hormonal contraceptive used to prevent pregnancy. This eMedTV page offers more information on Gianvi, including how this birth control pill should be taken and potential side effects. A link to more detail is also included.
  • Gianvi Dosage
    This eMedTV resource explains that it's important to carefully follow Gianvi dosing guidelines, as missing pills increases your risk of pregnancy. This page covers tips on taking this birth control pill, as well as what to do if you miss any pills.
  • Gianvi Side Effects
    Commonly reported Gianvi side effects include nausea, headache, and spotting. This eMedTV page describes other side effects that have been reported with this birth control pill, including potentially serious problems that require medical care.
  • Heather
    Available by prescription, Heather is a progestin-only birth control pill. This eMedTV article explains how the pill works and offers a more in-depth look at its effects, safety warnings, dosing information, and potential side effects.
  • Heather Birth Control Information
    Heather is a prescription birth control pill that contains only progestin. This eMedTV resource provides more information on this form of birth control, explaining Heather's dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and general safety precautions.
  • Heather Dosage
    When using Heather, take one pill every day, at the same time each day. As this eMedTV page explains, your risk of pregnancy increases if you do not follow Heather dosing guidelines carefully. This page explains what to do if you miss any doses.
  • How Does Depo-Provera Cause Osteoporosis?
    Depo-Provera can decrease the amount of calcium in your bones. This article from the eMedTV Web site takes a closer look at how Depo-Provera can cause osteoporosis and offers a link to more details on safety precautions associated with this drug.
  • How Does Emergency Contraception Work?
    This eMedTV video describes how emergency contraception works.
  • How Does Medroxyprogesterone Work?
    If you have been prescribed medroxyprogesterone, you may have questions about how it works. This eMedTV article offers an explanation of how this prescription hormone works and provides a link to more details on the topic.
  • How Effective Is Emergency Contraception?
    This eMedTV video describes the effectiveness of emergency contraception.
  • How Long After Quitting Depo-Provera Injections Can a Woman Become Pregnant?
    As this eMedTV page explains, it can take 10 months or longer for a woman to become pregnant after stopping Depo-Provera. This article discusses the research on how long it can take for a woman to become pregnant after quitting Depo-Provera injections.
  • How Long Does One Depo-Provera Shot Last?
    As this eMedTV Web selection explains, it can take many months for Depo-Provera to be removed from the body. This page further discusses how long one Depo-Provera shot lasts and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • How Long to Start Period After Medroxyprogesterone?
    If you are using medroxyprogesterone to restore your period, you may wonder how long it will take to work. This eMedTV Web article looks at starting your menstrual period after using medroxyprogesterone, including a link to more information.
  • How Safe Is Emergency Contraception?
    This eMedTV video discusses the safety and potential side effects of emergency contraception.
  • Indinavir
    Indinavir is a prescription medicine that is approved for treating HIV and AIDS in adults. This page on the eMedTV site describes the effects of indinavir, explains how the drug works, and lists possible side effects that may occur during treatment.
  • Indinavir Dosing
    The usual indinavir dosage for adults is 800 mg every eight hours. As this eMedTV page explains, however, indinavir dosing may be lowered for certain people (such as those with liver disease or who are taking drugs that may interact with indinavir).
  • Indinavir Sulfate for HIV/AIDS
    If you have HIV or AIDS, you may be interested in a medication called indinavir sulfate. This eMedTV selection gives a brief overview of this drug, including details on how it is taken. A link to more in-depth information is also included.
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